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2014
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2018
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Photos: Ayala Berger
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Polly Campbell
PI
CV  googlescholar

polly.campbell@ucr.edu

I am fascinated by conflict as a driver of evolution, especially on sex chromosomes. The structure and evolution of Y chromosomes, and the under-appreciated diversity of mammalian sex chromosome systems are my current primary obsessions. Speciation genetics and mother-offspring negotiations in the prenatal environment are also high on the list. When I’m not wondering how I got so lucky and when They’re going to find out I don’t belong, I enjoy cacti, cats (selectively), dogs (indiscriminately), keeping conflict evolutionary, mountains, sunshine, trail running.
Ayala Berger
PhD candidate (co-advised with Chris Clark)
ayala.berger@email.ucr.edu

I am broadly interested in “beauty” and the evolution of elaborate traits. Specifically, I am interested in the intersections between animal signals, and in how the environment and other sources of selection shape signal evolution. My dissertation research is on Anna's and Costa's hummingbirds’ acoustic courtship displays. I am also passionate about outreach centered around natural history and the importance of open spaces. When I am not hiding in bushes recording hummingbirds, I enjoy swimming, playing chamber music, exploring outdoors, photography, and befriending dogs. 
Sarah Gardner
PhD candidate
sgard014@ucr.edu

My broad research interests include how the developmental environment that an embryo experiences can impact adult behavioral traits. My dissertation research investigates the presence/absence of the prenatal microbiome in house mice (Mus m. domesticus), and the potential effects of genotype on the community composition of the prenatal microbiome. Outside of research, I spend my time baking, playing Dungeons and Dragons, and reading fantasy novels!
Jonathan Hughes
Postdoc
jonathhu@ucr.edu


Broadly, I study the processes of diversification in mammals through a combination of cytogenetics, systematics, and genomics. I'm especially interested in the causes and consequences of chromosomal rearrangements, and most of my work to date has involved rodents with peculiar karyotypes. In my postdoc, I'm studying the evolution of Microtus voles and their multifarious chromosomes, with an emphasis on the extraordinary XX/XO system of the creeping vole. Outside of work, I'm partial to hiking, board games, and cooking.
Emma Knoles
PhD student
eknol001@ucr.edu


I am interested in investigating evidence for sex ratio (SR) drive in the creeping vole (Microtus oregoni), a species in which non-disjunction in the male germline results in sex-specific transmission of both sex chromosomes. I hope to advance understanding of the recently proposed role of sex chromosome aneuploidy as a mechanism of drive suppression, and the evolution of SR drivers in nature. I am from Kansas and enjoy spending my time outdoors with my dogs. 
Harrison Lin
PhD student
hlin023@ucr.edu

I am interested in the process of speciation as well as complex social behaviors and interactions between animals. Currently, I am studying the speciation process between two California vole (Microtus californicuslineages. I am particularly interested in the apparent lack of hybridization between the two lineages, despite a contact zone with no apparent physical barriers. When I am not studying these voles, I like to explore the outdoors, work out, binge Kdramas and anime, and watch old movies. I have also recently gotten into makeup and cosplay.
Natalie Bishara
Undergraduate researcher
natalie.bishara@email.ucr.edu


I am a third-year undergraduate student majoring in Biology with an interest in genetic activity in gametogenesis and embryogenesis in animals, especially in humans. I hope to further study embryonic development in humans throughout the rest of my undergraduate and postgraduate studies. I also enjoy reading and studying languages! 
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Jimmy Choi
Undergraduate researcher
jimmy.choi@email.ucr.edu

In the most general sense, I'm interested in ecology, evolution, and the interplay between these two in forming the diversity of life. More specifically, I'm using data (and a little R) to link traits from mammals (currently variant sex chromosome systems) to various bioclimatic variables, with respect to phylogenetics. In between, I fill the time by reading a lot, riding my bike, and performing music-adjacent activities such as collecting vinyl.
2018
2019
2017
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2022
2017
2014
Lab Alumni
Post-doc
Lena Arévalo

Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (INIA-CSIC)

 

Bonginkosi Gumbi

Graduate
Kelsey Brass
Tyler Ryan
Undergraduate
Noah Allen
Reem Chamas

Nicole Clapp
Cameron Gilbreath
Sam Grider
Nate Herndon
Brian Horn
Morgan Johnston

Laura Kollmorgen

Andrew Lim
Heather Martin

Abbey McClellan
Katie McDonald

Kayleen Negron
Marlie Nightingale
Angel Ramnani

Attika Secondi
Eleanor Shore
Ariel Steele
Emily West
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